What’s Trending? 📈 Agonizing and organizing

Let’s leave it all on the field.

This piece was originally published in the October 28, 2020 edition of CAP Action’s weekly newsletter, What’s Trending? Subscribe to What’s Trending? here.

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WHAT’S TRENDING THIS WEEK

  • Donald Trump sat down for an interview with 60 Minutes, until he became angry with the line of questioning and abruptly ended filming. During the interview, he again called for the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act and promised a better replacement, despite no such plan existing.
  • In an unprecedented move just eight days before the conclusion of voting in this election, the Senate voted 52–48 to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court late Monday evening.

WHAT WE’RE HEARING ON SOCIAL

Here are this week’s top five Facebook posts on the Left and Right:

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5 best-performing Facebook posts by total interactions among 200 of the largest conservative and progressive pages for the week of October 20–26, according to data from NewsWhip

“Trump has convinced millions of Americans that the virus is illegitimate.”

This is extremely concerning, to say the least. The president’s Facebook post baselessly accusing the media of elevating the pandemic for political reasons received more than 430,000 interactions. And no matter what happens next Tuesday, Americans will still be facing a brutal pandemic that is killing hundreds of thousands of people and saddling untold numbers with long-term debilitations. Our next president — whoever he may be — must lead the country out of this tragedy. And that will mean grappling with the reality that Trump has convinced millions of Americans that the virus is illegitimate.

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Most-interacted with posts about the coronavirus from October 20–26, according to data from NewsWhip.
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Top five Facebook posts from conservative pages about the coronavirus, according to data from NewsWhip.
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Top five Facebook posts from progressive pages about the coronavirus, according to data from NewsWhip.
  1. Start from a neutral place. Try not to make assumptions about what the other person thinks or feels.
  2. Start off the conversation with understanding. Learn the other person’s position.
  3. Look for where you agree. If you disagree on policy, maybe you share values or goals.
  4. Give the other person space to respond. This is a conversation, not a reprimand.
  5. Avoid using “but.” Use “and” instead.
  6. Use stories. They provide support for your argument.
  7. Avoid being provocative. It will end the conversation and start an argument.

SAY IT WITH ME

  • As evidenced by the skyrocketing number of COVID cases in the U.S., the disinformation that we’re seeing about COVID is dangerous.
  • Studies have shown that Trump, Republicans, and the media are the biggest amplifiers of disinformation about mail-in voting and that social media supports that proliferation.
  • Trump is using the same playbook to spread lies about the coronavirus.

ON MY RADAR

  • The Senate Commerce Committee will hold a hearing with the CEOs of Facebook, Twitter, and Google today at 10am ET. You can stream it on the committee’s website.
  • Join Health Care Voter tonight for the final episode of their “What’s at Stake?” series — titled “America’s Newest Pre-Existing Condition,” live on Facebook and Twitter at 6pm ET for a discussion on the pandemic and its impact on American health care.
  • Sunday, November 1, marks the beginning of Native American Heritage Month.
  • For good measure, we’re almost there! Voting for the 2020 election officially ends on Tuesday, November 3.

ASK ALEX

This week a reader writes, “You’ve mentioned that graphics are performing really well on Facebook right now. Which types?”

  • Copy-heavy graphics are no longer a problem. Some of the biggest pages in progressive politics have copy covering the entire graphic.
  • Photos of popular politicians grab attention.
  • Undesigned creative performs well, whether it’s intended to look like a screenshot of a chart or an illustrated graphic that would look at-home on Instagram.

Written by

Hard-hitting news + analysis paired with action on the issues that matter most. Working alongside @AmProg.

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